Value modes in philanthropy

Giving behaviour varies markedly between value modes (the different groups of people, defined by values based on Maslow’s hierarchy of needs).

This is discussed in a paper here: about who gives to charity, who doesn’t, why not & what do to about it.

We are interested in testing a hypothesis that the ‘giving industry’ is dominated by one segment. If you work or have a strong interest in increasing or improving charitable giving, please answer the questions in the Value Mode survey here, and then post on this page which mode you are. We will plot the frequency. (Posts are not uploaded automatically, so if you would like to be anonymous, please indicate that and we will respect it.)

Tally:

12: Inner Directed (11 transcenders + one Transitional).

2 Outer Directed (one Now Person & one Happy Follower).

[Between us, those nine are: Director, family foundation; individual donor; founder/ CEO, operational charity; two CEOs of operational charities; professional philanthropy advisor, several philanthropy commentators.]

Note: the survey uses 12 Value Modes, which fit into the three broader groups mentioned in the paper as follows:

Sustenance Driven Value Modes: Outer Directed Value Modes: Inner Directed Value Modes:
RootsSmooth sailingBrave new world

Certainty first

Golden dreamersHappy followersNow people

Tomorrow people

TransitionalsConcerned ethicalsFlexible individualists

Transcenders

17 Responses to Value modes in philanthropy

  1. Pingback: Who gives, why, who doesn’t, why not & what to do about it | Caroline Fiennes

  2. Diana Barran says:

    Dear Caroline- I am afraid that I too am a transcender!! And to think that I felt special when I saw the result!

    Best

    Diana

  3. Hi Diana,
    You’re in great company! And very uniform company – as you see, the hypothesis is bearing up: all of us in the philanthr-industry are transcenders!

  4. Hanah Caan says:

    Transcender! Just as you thought.

    H x

  5. reuben says:

    Hi,
    My view is that giving is a lot more nuanced than this. Indeed the whole history and heritage of charitable giving in the UK has been built on a sustenance-driven generation giving out of duty and and a belief in basic needs (the last generation to actually know hunger). However it is true that most people who work for charities could be defined as inner-directed; just as most people who work in marketing and advertising are outer-directed (hence the disparity in working cultures). Pretty much everyone can and will give – it’s just a matter of pushing the right buttons. And, clearly, stepping outside of your own values mode.

  6. Sophie says:

    This is fascinating! I work for an NGO in South Africa, worked for a charity when I lived in the UK and am a transcender. I was also quietly pleased with myself for this 🙂 Your point about changing how we communicate with non-givers is well taken and we are going to look at what we are doing here to activate the unengaged. Thank you.

  7. jeremy Summerfield says:

    ‘Happy Follower’ – work for an International Development charity as Major Donor Manager. Interesting article thanks.

  8. Joanna Westley says:

    I’m a fundraising manager and I’m a ‘Now Person’. Surprised myself!

  9. Sophie Hussey says:

    Another Transcender – fundraiser at arts charity.
    Would like to understand better the definition of Transcender…

  10. Ian says:

    According to the website – I’m a Now person thus in the Outer Directed category.

    I’m a bit disappointed! “We want the world and we want it NOW” – which apparently is my motto – is not one I recognise by the way.

    “…want (to help) the world and we want (to do) it NOW” would be more me I reckon…..

    Maybe it was because I indicated that I like to get the washing up done (I answered that I like tidiness) or because I try not to cut myself shaving (I take pride in my personal appearance) that I’ve been mis-categorised…..

  11. Laura says:

    transcender!

    L

  12. Brigid says:

    I’m a fundraiser and donor and came out “concerned ethical.” The final bit in the description said lacks compassion. Ack. I hope this isn’t true about me.

  13. I work in Philanthropy and I’m a transcender…sounds like a declaration at an AA meeting!! With the answers I was checking, this was the last thing I thought I’d be. Very interesting. Thanks!

  14. Pingback: Cheryl Cole Foundation: The most important 3 words | Caroline Fiennes @carolinefiennes

  15. Webber says:

    Hi,
    My view is that giving is a lot more nuanced than this. Indeed the whole history and heritage of charitable giving in the UK has been built on a sustenance-driven generation giving out of duty and and a belief in basic needs (the last generation to actually know hunger). However it is true that most people who work for charities could be defined as inner-directed; just as most people who work in marketing and advertising are outer-directed (hence the disparity in working cultures). Pretty much everyone can and will give – it’s just a matter of pushing the right buttons. And, clearly, stepping outside of your own values mode.

    +1

  16. Pingback: Cheryl Cole Foundation: The most important 3 words | Giving Evidence

  17. jhd says:

    Your values orientation is that of a PIONEER.

    People with this orientation often have the following characteristics:

    > Trying to put things together and understand the big picture.
    > Concerned about the environment, society, world poverty, etc.
    > Always looking for new questions and answers.
    > Strong internal sense of what is right and what is wrong.
    > Strong desire for fairness, justice and equality.
    > Self-assured and sense of self-agency.
    > Generally positive about change, if it is worthwhile.
    > Cautiously optimistic about the future.

    & I’m probably in the right job!

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